Category

Humanity

Awesome Poet

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Sound poetry is an artistic form bridging literary and musical composition, in which the phonetic aspects of human speech are foregrounded instead of more conventional semantic and syntactic values; “verse without words”. By definition, sound poetry is intended primarily for performance.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color5″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″ bottom_margin=”no”]The vanguards of the 20th Century[/ish_headline][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]

While it is sometimes argued that the roots of sound poetry are to be found in oral poetry traditions, the writing of pure sound texts that downplay the roles of meaning and structure is a 20th-century phenomenon. The Futurist and Dadaist Vanguards of the beginning of this century were the pioneers in creating the first sound poetry forms. Filippo Tommaso Marinetti discovered that onomatopoeias were useful to describe a battle in Tripoli where he was a soldier, creating a sound text that became a sort of a spoken photograph of the battle. Dadaists were more involved in sound poetry and they invented different categories:

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  • Bruitist poem it is the phonetic poem, not so different from the futurist poem. Invented by Richard Huelsenbeck.
  • Simultaneous poem a poem read in different languages, with different rhythms, tonalities, and by different persons at the same time. Invented by Tristan Tzara.
  • Movement poem is the poem accompanied by primitive movements.

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Sound poetry evolved into visual poetry and concrete poetry, two forms based in visual arts issues although the sound images are always very compelling in them. Later on, with the development of the magnetic tape recorder, sound poetry evolved thanks to the upcoming of the concrete music movement at the end of the 1940s. Some sound poetics were used by later poetry movements like the beat generation in the fifties or the spoken word movement in the 80’s, and by other art and music movements that brought up new forms such as text sound art that may be used for sound poems which more closely resemble “fiction or even essays, as traditionally defined, than poetry”.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”none” icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_quote author=”Plato” size=”h3″ align=”center” color=”color5″ tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]”Poetry comes nearer to vital truth than history.”[/ish_quote][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”none” icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]

It has been argued that “there is a paucity of information on women’s involvement in sound poetry, whether as practitioners, theorists, or even simply as listeners.” Among the earliest female practitioners are Berlin poet Else Lasker-Schüler, who experimented in what she called “Ursprache” (Ur-language), and the New York Dada poet and performer Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. The Baroness’s poem “Klink-Hratzvenga (Death-wail)” was published in The Little Review in March 1920 to great controversy. Written in response to her husband Leopold von Freytag-Loringhoven’s suicide, the sound poem was “a mourning song in nonsense sounds that transcended national boundaries”. The Baroness was also known for her sexually charged sound poetry, as seen in “Teke Heart (Beating of Heart),” only recently published.

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In their essay “Harpsichords Metallic Howl—”, Irene Gammel and Suzanne Zelazo review the theories of sound by Charles Bernstein, Gerald Bruns, Min-Quian Ma, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Jeffrey McCaffery and others to argue that sonic poetry foregrounds its own corporality. Thus “the Baroness’s sound poems let her body speak through her expansive use of sound, the Baroness conveys the fluidity of gender as a constantly changing, polysemous signifier.” In this way, somatic art becomes the poet’s own “space-sound.”

Of course, for many dadaists, such as Hugo Ball, sound poetry also presented a language of trauma, a cacophony used to protest the sound of the cannons of World War I. It was as T. J. Demos writes, “a telling stutter, a nervous echolalia.”

The Life

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Life is a characteristic distinguishing physical entities having biological processes (such as signaling and self-sustaining processes) from those that do not, either because such functions have ceased (death), or because they lack such functions and are classified as inanimate. Various forms of life exist such as plants, animals, fungi, protists, archaea, and bacteria. The criteria can at times be ambiguous and may or may not define viruses, viroids or potential artificial life as living. Biology is the primary science concerned with the study of life, although many other sciences are involved.

The smallest contiguous unit of life is called an organism. Organisms are composed of one or more cells, undergo metabolism, maintain homeostasis, can grow, respond to stimuli, reproduce (either sexually or asexually) and, through evolution, adapt to their environment in successive generations. A diverse array of living organisms can be found in the biosphere of Earth, and the properties common to these organisms—plants, animals,fungi, protists, archaea, and bacteria—are a carbon- and water-based cellular form with complex organization and heritable genetic information.

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Some of the earliest theories of life were materialist, holding that all that exists is matter, and that life is merely a complex form or arrangement of matter. Empedocles (430 BC) argued that every thing in the universe is made up of a combination of four eternal “elements” or “roots of all”: earth, water, air, and fire. All change is explained by the arrangement and rearrangement of these four elements. The various forms of life are caused by an appropriate mixture of elements.

Democritus (460 BC) thought that the essential characteristic of life is having a soul (psyche). Like other ancient writers, he was attempting to explain what makes something a living thing. His explanation was that fiery atoms make a soul in exactly the same way atoms and void account for any other thing. He elaborates on fire because of the apparent connection between life and heat, and because fire moves.

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Hylomorphism is a theory, originating with Aristotle (322 BC), that all things are a combination of matter and form. Biology was one of his main interests, and there is extensive biological material in his extant writings. In this view, all things in the material universe have both matter and form, and the form of a living thing is its soul (Greek psyche, Latin anima). There are three kinds of souls: the vegetative soul of plants, which causes them to grow and decay and nourish themselves, but does not cause motion and sensation; the animal soul, which causes animals to move and feel; and the rational soul, which is the source of consciousness and reasoning, which (Aristotle believed) is found only in man. Each higher soul has all the attributes of the lower one. Aristotle believed that while matter can exist without form, form cannot exist without matter, and therefore the soul cannot exist without the body.

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Vitalism is the belief that the life-principle is non-material. This originated with Stahl (17th century), and held sway until the middle of the 19th century. It appealed to philosophers such as Henri Bergson, Nietzsche, Wilhelm Dilthey, anatomists like Bichat, and chemists like Liebig. Vitalism included the idea that there was a fundamental difference between organic and inorganic material, and the belief that organic material can only be derived from living things. This was disproved in 1828, when Friedrich Wöhler prepared urea from inorganic materials.[34] This Wöhler synthesis is considered the starting point of modern organic chemistry. It is of historical significance because for the first time an organic compound was produced from inorganic reactants.

During the 1850s, Helmholtz, anticipated by Mayer, demonstrated that no energy is lost in muscle movement, suggesting that there were no “vital forces” necessary to move a muscle. These results led to the abandonment of scientific interest in vitalistic theories, although the belief lingered on in pseudoscientific theories such as homeopathy, which interprets diseases and sickness as caused by disturbances in a hypothetical vital force or life force.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”none” icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_quote author=”Deodatta V. Shenai-Khatkhate” size=”h4″ align=”center” color=”none” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]”Always be Honest and Truthful, even though it might hurt or create conflicts.
Be in sync with your personal values, and make choices based on what you believe, and not on what others like. Live the life with Honesty, Truth and Integrity.”[/ish_quote]

Beautiful Things

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A hill town is any citadel town built upon hills to make invasion difficult. Often protected by defensive walls, steep embankments, or cliffs, such hilltop settlements provided natural defenses for their inhabitants.

In Europe, especially in Italy, Spain, Portugal and southern France, such towns were common.

The Spanish even brought the traditional European hill town to the Americas, a notable example being the 16th century Mexican hill town of Guanajuato. However, fortified hill towns were by no means solely a European creation. For instance, Incan fortified hill towns predated the arrival of the Spanish by many centuries and rival those of Europe. Machu Picchu, an Incan hill town completed in the mid-15th century in Peru, although now in ruins, is considered perhaps the most beautiful hill town ever constructed. Construction of fortified hill towns was common in many civilizations. Ancient examples can also be found in Africa and Asia.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”color2″ icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_quote author=”Mehmet Murat ildan” size=”h4″ align=”center” color=”color5″ tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]”A beautiful idea is a beautiful door. It invites you to enter inside!”[/ish_quote][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”color2″ icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]

Around the world, the most famous examples are the hilltowns of Darjeeling and Simla.

In recent years, Bill Buchanan, Douglas Duany, Lucian Steil and others have studied hill towns with an interest in reviving interest in the enduring form.

Buchanan has argued that the form gives comfort regardless of current threat, as we’ve evolved to like our back protected while able to view all who approach. It makes our space inhabited large, he contends.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color5″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]Just have a look[/ish_headline][ish_gallery images=”450,366,447″ thumbnail_size=”theme-large” columns=”3″ ratio=”square” animation=”slide” nav_align=”left” nav_color=”color1″ prevnext_color=”color3″ border_width=”1″ tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”color2″ icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_quote author=”Frank Stephens” size=”h4″ align=”center” color=”none” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]”The bigger the hill you climb, The more you can see from the top,
The more you enjoy the ride down, And the longer the ride lasts.”[/ish_quote]