Category

Nature

White Kingdom

The White Mountains of California and Nevada are a triangular fault block mountain range facing the Sierra Nevada across the upper Owens Valley. They extend for approximately 60 mi (97 km) as a greatly elevated plateau about 20 mi (32 km) wide on the south, narrowing to a point at the north, with elevations generally increasing south to north. The range’s broad southern end is near the community of Big Pine, where Westgard Pass and Deep Springs Valley separate it from the Inyo Mountains. The narrow northern end is at Montgomery Pass, where U.S. Route 6 crosses. The Fish Lake Valley lies east of the range; the southeast part of the mountains are separated from the Silver Peak Range by block faulting across the Furnace Creek Fault Zone, forming a feeder valley to Fish Lake Valley. The range lies within the eastern section of the Inyo National Forest.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”color2″ icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_blog_media tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”color2″ icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]
[ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color5″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″ bottom_margin=”no”]History of The White Mountains[/ish_headline][ish_headline tag_size=”h4″ color=”none” icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]Cattle from ranches in surrounding valleys are still grazed under permit as high as the alpine zone.[/ish_headline]

Historically sheep were also grazed in large numbers, introducing diseases from which the native Bighorn Sheep populations are still slowly recovering. Before European colonization of surrounding valleys in the mid 19th century, PaiuteIndians occupied summer hunting camps up to about 13,100 ft (4,000 m), leaving ruins of archeological interest.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color5″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″ bottom_margin=”no”]Hiking[/ish_headline][ish_headline tag_size=”h4″ color=”none” icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]A four-wheel drive road reaches the summit from the south to service the summit laboratory of the White Mountain Research Station.[/ish_headline]

The road is normally gated seven miles from the summit at an elevation of 11,680 ft (3,560 m), making this California’s easiest 14,000 ft (4,300 m) summit. North of White Mountain Peak, two sharp arêtes alternate along the crest with broad “whalebacks” and high plateaus with about six more summits over 13,000 ft (4,000 m). The crest crosses the California-Nevada state line just south of a final high summit Boundary Peak 13,147 ft (4,007 m), Nevada’s high point. Boundary Peak is the “prow” of the triangular fault block. It has views directly down into valleys to the west, north and east that are hidden by the increasing width of the high plateau to the south. North of Boundary Peak the range rapidly loses altitude and ends at Montgomery Pass.

The west face of the White Mountains rises steeply out of Owens Valley. Climbing to any summit from this direction is a scramble with about 8,000 ft (2,400 m) elevation gain. Eastern slopes are somewhat gentler and have numerous cirques left by Pleistoceneglaciers and even a few snowfields persisting through most summers. Most of these cirques are entered or approached by jeep roads and offer scenic yet non-technical routes to the crest.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_gallery images=”349,19,441″ thumbnail_size=”theme-large” columns=”3″ animation=”slide” nav_align=”left” nav_color=”color1″ prevnext_color=”color3″ border_width=”1″ tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″ ratio=”square”][ish_gallery images=”358,444,440,447″ thumbnail_size=”theme-half” columns=”4″ animation=”slide” nav_align=”left” nav_color=”color1″ prevnext_color=”color3″ border_width=”1″ tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″ ratio=”rectangle16″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]

Simplicity Everywhere

[ish_quote author=”George Bernard Shaw” size=”h3″ align=”center” color=”color5″ tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]”Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about
creating yourself.”[/ish_quote][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”color2″ icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color5″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]Quotes about simplicity[/ish_headline]

Simplicity is the state or quality of being simple. Something which is easy to understand or explain is simple, in contrast to something complicated. Alternatively, as Herbert A. Simon suggested, something is simple or complex depending on the way we choose to describe it.

In some uses, simplicity can be used to imply beauty, purity, or clarity. Simplicity may also be used in a negative connotation to denote a deficit or insufficiency of nuance or complexity of a thing, relative to what is supposed to be required.

The concept of simplicity has been related to in the field of epistemology. According to Occam’s razor, all other things being equal, the simplest theory is the most likely to be true. In the context of human lifestyle, simplicity can denote freedom from hardship, effort or confusion. Specifically, it can refer to a simple living style.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_gallery images=”366,358″ thumbnail_size=”theme-large” columns=”2″ ratio=”rectangle16″ animation=”slide” nav_align=”left” nav_color=”color1″ prevnext_color=”color3″ border_width=”1″ tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color5″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]Minimal art, minimalism in visual art[/ish_headline]

Minimalism in the arts began in post–World War II Western Art, most strongly with American visual arts in the 1960s and early 1970s. Prominent artists associated with minimalism include Donald Judd, John McCracken, Agnes Martin, Dan Flavin, Robert Morris, Anne Truitt, and Frank Stella. It derives from the reductive aspects of Modernism and is often interpreted as a reaction against Abstract expressionism and a bridge to Postminimal art practices.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_quote author=”Unknown” size=”h4″ align=”center” color=”color5″ tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]”In the visual arts and music, minimalism is a style that uses pared-down design elements.”[/ish_quote][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]

Minimalism in music features repetition and iteration such as those of the compositions of La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich, Philip Glass, and John Adams. Minimalist compositions are sometimes known as systems music. The term “minimalist” often colloquially refers to anything that is spare or stripped to its essentials. It has also been used to describe the plays and novels of Samuel Beckett, the films of Robert Bresson, the stories of Raymond Carver, and the automobile designs of Colin Chapman. The word was first used in English in the early 20th century to describe “a 1913 composition by the Russian painter Kasimir Malevich of a black square on a white ground”.

On the Top of the World

[ish_headline tag_size="h3" color="color5" icon_align="left" tag="h" tooltip_color="color1" tooltip_text_color="color3"]Top of the World Highway[/ish_headline] The Top of the World Highway is a 127-kilometre long highway, beginning at a junction with the Taylor Highway near Jack Wade, Alaska traveling east to its terminus at the ferry terminal in West Dawson, Yukon, on the western banks of the Yukon River....

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The Life

[ish_blog_media tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”none” icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_headline tag_size=”h2″ color=”color5″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″ align=”center”]Life[/ish_headline]

Life is a characteristic distinguishing physical entities having biological processes (such as signaling and self-sustaining processes) from those that do not, either because such functions have ceased (death), or because they lack such functions and are classified as inanimate. Various forms of life exist such as plants, animals, fungi, protists, archaea, and bacteria. The criteria can at times be ambiguous and may or may not define viruses, viroids or potential artificial life as living. Biology is the primary science concerned with the study of life, although many other sciences are involved.

The smallest contiguous unit of life is called an organism. Organisms are composed of one or more cells, undergo metabolism, maintain homeostasis, can grow, respond to stimuli, reproduce (either sexually or asexually) and, through evolution, adapt to their environment in successive generations. A diverse array of living organisms can be found in the biosphere of Earth, and the properties common to these organisms—plants, animals,fungi, protists, archaea, and bacteria—are a carbon- and water-based cellular form with complex organization and heritable genetic information.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_gallery images=”353,442″ thumbnail_size=”theme-large” columns=”2″ animation=”slide” nav_align=”left” nav_color=”color1″ prevnext_color=”color3″ border_width=”1″ tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″ ratio=”rectangle16″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”none” icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color5″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″ align=”center”]Materialism[/ish_headline]

Some of the earliest theories of life were materialist, holding that all that exists is matter, and that life is merely a complex form or arrangement of matter. Empedocles (430 BC) argued that every thing in the universe is made up of a combination of four eternal “elements” or “roots of all”: earth, water, air, and fire. All change is explained by the arrangement and rearrangement of these four elements. The various forms of life are caused by an appropriate mixture of elements.

Democritus (460 BC) thought that the essential characteristic of life is having a soul (psyche). Like other ancient writers, he was attempting to explain what makes something a living thing. His explanation was that fiery atoms make a soul in exactly the same way atoms and void account for any other thing. He elaborates on fire because of the apparent connection between life and heat, and because fire moves.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”none” icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color5″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″ align=”center”]Hylomorphism[/ish_headline]

Hylomorphism is a theory, originating with Aristotle (322 BC), that all things are a combination of matter and form. Biology was one of his main interests, and there is extensive biological material in his extant writings. In this view, all things in the material universe have both matter and form, and the form of a living thing is its soul (Greek psyche, Latin anima). There are three kinds of souls: the vegetative soul of plants, which causes them to grow and decay and nourish themselves, but does not cause motion and sensation; the animal soul, which causes animals to move and feel; and the rational soul, which is the source of consciousness and reasoning, which (Aristotle believed) is found only in man. Each higher soul has all the attributes of the lower one. Aristotle believed that while matter can exist without form, form cannot exist without matter, and therefore the soul cannot exist without the body.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”none” icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color5″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″ align=”center”]Vitalism[/ish_headline]

Vitalism is the belief that the life-principle is non-material. This originated with Stahl (17th century), and held sway until the middle of the 19th century. It appealed to philosophers such as Henri Bergson, Nietzsche, Wilhelm Dilthey, anatomists like Bichat, and chemists like Liebig. Vitalism included the idea that there was a fundamental difference between organic and inorganic material, and the belief that organic material can only be derived from living things. This was disproved in 1828, when Friedrich Wöhler prepared urea from inorganic materials.[34] This Wöhler synthesis is considered the starting point of modern organic chemistry. It is of historical significance because for the first time an organic compound was produced from inorganic reactants.

During the 1850s, Helmholtz, anticipated by Mayer, demonstrated that no energy is lost in muscle movement, suggesting that there were no “vital forces” necessary to move a muscle. These results led to the abandonment of scientific interest in vitalistic theories, although the belief lingered on in pseudoscientific theories such as homeopathy, which interprets diseases and sickness as caused by disturbances in a hypothetical vital force or life force.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_text_separator tag_size=”h1″ text_color=”none” icon_align=”left” tag=”div” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″][ish_quote author=”Deodatta V. Shenai-Khatkhate” size=”h4″ align=”center” color=”none” tooltip_color=”color1″ tooltip_text_color=”color3″]”Always be Honest and Truthful, even though it might hurt or create conflicts.
Be in sync with your personal values, and make choices based on what you believe, and not on what others like. Live the life with Honesty, Truth and Integrity.”[/ish_quote]

When The Day Ends

[ish_quote author="Ralph Waldo Emerson" align="center" color="none" tooltip_color="color1" tooltip_text_color="color3" size="h3"]The sky is the daily bread of the eyes.[/ish_quote][ish_divider tooltip_color="color1" tooltip_text_color="color3"][ish_text_separator tag_size="h1" text_color="color2" icon_align="left" tag="div" tooltip_color="color1" tooltip_text_color="color3"][ish_divider tooltip_color="color1" tooltip_text_color="color3"] When the sun is near the horizon, sunlight travels through a greater depth of atmosphere, reducing the intensity of the direct light, so that more of the illumination...

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